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do they talk about the united states and how do they talk about the union and the confederacy. how do they talk about the south that it would substantially different from each other and voila i would have something to say so i headed off into the archives. >> first of all but archives? >> archive server every state that fought in the war in this book. some are the huge ones that immediately come to mind the library of congress or carlisle barracks in pennsylvania which has an enormous army history collection but also smaller libraries state historical associations, the alabama department of the agriculture the vermont historical society in independence misery and again the point was i didn't want to read more about u.s. grant i wanted to be about the back of the line so that's why i looked for him. i look at the flag and i think of my farm or my wife and mother they didn't cooperate and do what i wanted them to do and i was frustrated with them for that reason petraeus too were you find a similar thing before the union and confederate soldiers? >> two things. i knew the union and conf
, and he is the president of the united states. wilson, he is sick. but he sends his secretary of state to the convention to emcee the convention. >> host: he wanted the nomination. >> guest: he wanted the nomination, and harding, coolidge, hoover, fdr is on the ticket as a vice presidential candidate, and so you have this hook and so much else going on with the league of nations and everything other thing. and 1960, we move on to where you have three titanic personalities. we don't have six but we have three of the biggest name brands in presidential personalities ever. kennedy, nixon, johnson, and so very, very different. so very, very different amibitions in terms of personal, and something which i think resonates so much with folks who are reading books today. 1948, a great cliffhanger, and we love to listen to the experts and get the weather reports, and they're always wrong, and the polls are always wrong, and the experts are always wrong, and by god we love it when we're smarter than they are, and it turns out we can look back in hindsight and see how wrong they were in 1948. and
and to perceive that among our membership, one of our members is now president of the united states. [applause] and so it's all the struggles he suffered in the civil rights movement, with all of them marching in the prey and dying people have done for us, please don't any of you walk away without realizing that the struggle continues. and the same type of mentality that would prevent us from voting yesterday exists today with the same motivation to stop this from voting. so with all the pride, dignity and feelings that we have a super weekend and where we are today, please come each and every one of you walk away believing that this is just the beginning, for you, for your children and for your children's children. take me off. [applause] >> charlie rangel everybody. my name is charlie. and now, this is the 42nd annual legislative conference and i want to welcome you to the national town hall meeting. as cochair of this year's annual legislative conference, it's been an on-air and quite frankly a thrill to work with my giant, and i mean that figuratively and literally, congressman andre carso
and civil service professionals who represent the united states around the globe. the presiding officer: without objection, the senate will proceed to that measure. mr. durbin scwarks i further ask the resolution be agreed to, the preamble be agreed to, the motion to reconsider be laid upon the table with no intervening action or debate and any related statements be printed in the record as if read. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. durbin: i understand there is a bill at the desk. i ask for its first reading. the presiding officer: the clerk will read the title of the bill for the first time. the clerk: h.r. 3949, an act to extend the fisa amendments act of 2008 for five years. mr. durbin: i now ask for a second reading and in order to place the bill on the calendar, i object to my own request. the presiding officer: the objection is heard. the title of the bill will be read again on the second legislative day. mr. durbin: i ask unanimous consent when the senate completes its business today, it adjourn until 2:00 p.m. on monday, september 17, 2012, for a pro forma session.
in the united states are not decided by the popular vote. instead, we have the electoral votes where everybody gets another vote for the states that allocate their electrical votes will so that gives us outcomes in a number of battleground states. this is as we laid it out in the first case. we have six states in the midwest area, ohio, michigan, and ohio, states in the southwest, colorado, new mexico and nevada. virginia and florida in the south. all of the states are pretty different. the six states in the midwest are much more heavy and have a slow level of demographic change and they are more bechler changing slowly. that is favorable in showing preference for barack obama could with that in mind, let's look at some of the particular swing states that are in play. more than any other state, perhaps ohio is one of the pogroms. a state that was believed to be for mitt romney, but if obama holds all six electoral votes, he is only four electoral votes short of victory. critical romney strategy in the state of ohio. that is not happening at this point. at this point, some of the data on the bo
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5